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Wednesday, October 24, 2012

Celery Soup

The Reviews are In! After our best opening weekend ever, wonderful audience reaction and excellent reviews, we invite you to the second week of Made-Not Bought, the new installment of Celery Soup, "Florida's Folklife Play" We had our most successful opening weekend ever which included hundreds of thrilled audience members, an inspired cast and a visit from theater critic Carl F Gauze of Archikulture Digest. Mr. Gauze stated: "I think this is the true heart of Community Theatre- local stories, local talent and a production that mixes brilliance and pathos with awkward moments of heartfelt writing...worth the drive up I-4." Read the whole review here: http://blogs.ink19.com/archikulture/2012/10/21/made-not-bought/ Let our cast of over 40 illuminate the lesson that our homes are not bought but made with love, friendship, trust and community. Original music, dance and a script crafted with a laugh and a twist will leave you wanting another big helping of Celery Soup! Show Times: Friday and Saturday, 8:00PM, doors open at 7:30PM Sunday, 3:00PM, doors open at 2:30PM For Tickets: www.celerysoupsanford.com 321-578-1463 Tickets on sale in our office in the Historic Sanford Welcome Center, 230 E 1st Street, Sanford, FL from 11am-2pm Mon-Fri. The Princess Theater 115 West 1st Street, Sanford, Florida, 32771

Friday, June 8, 2012

Monday, January 18, 2010

Oldies but Goodies


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TnPINGavPP0

Tim Hawkins

Monday, July 20, 2009

Sunday, March 1, 2009

The Coal Basket

The Coal Basket Bible

The story is told of an old man who lived on a farm in the mountains of Kentucky with his young grandson. Each morning, Grandpa was up early sitting at the kitchen table reading from his old worn-out Bible. His grandson who wanted to be just like him tried to imitate him in any way he could.

One day the grandson asked, "Papa, I try to read the Bible just like you but I don't understand it, and what I do understand I forget as soon as I close the book. What good does reading the Bible do?"

The Grandfather quietly turned from putting coal in the stove and said, "Take this coal basket down to the river and bring back a basket of water."

The boy did as he was told, even though all the water leaked out before he could get back to the house. The grandfather laughed and said, "You will have to move a little faster next time," and sent him back to the river with the basket to try again.

This time the boy ran faster, but again the basket was empty before he returned home. Out of breath, he told his grandfather that it was "impossible to carry water in a basket," and he went to get a bucket instead.

The old man said, "I don't want a bucket of water; I want a basket of water. You can do this. You're just not trying hard enough," and he went out the door to watch the boy try again.

At this point, the boy knew it was impossible, but he wanted to show his grandfather that even if he ran as fast as he could, the water would leak out before he got far at all. The boy scooped the water and ran hard, but when he reached his grandfather the basket was again empty. Out of breath, he said, "See Papa, it's useless!"

"So you think it is useless?" the old man said. "Look at the basket."

The boy looked at the basket and for the first time he realized that the basket looked different. Instead of a dirty old coal basket, it was clean.

"Son, that's what happens when you read the Bible. You might not understand or remember everything, but when you read it, it will change you from the inside out." That is the work of God in our lives, to change us from the inside out and to slowly transform us into the image of His son.

Friday, February 6, 2009

Five Generations of Her Hands!













GRANDMA'S HANDS

Grandma, some ninety plus years, sat feebly on the patio bench. She didn't move, just sat with her head down staring at her hands.

When I sat down beside her she didn't acknowledge my presence and the longer I sat I wondered if she was OK

Finally, not really wanting to disturb her but wanting to check on her at the same time, I asked her if she was OK. She raised her head and looked at me and smiled. 'Yes, I'm fine, thank you for asking,' she said in a clear voice strong.

'I didn't mean to disturb you, grandma, but you were just sitting here staring at your hands and I wanted to make sure you were OK,' I explained to her.

'Have you ever looked at your hands,' she asked. 'I mean really looked at your hands?'

I slowly opened my hands and stared down at them. I turned them over, palms up and then palms down. No, I guess I had never really looked at my hands as I tried to figure out the point she was making.

Grandma smiled and related this story:

'Stop and think for a moment about the hands you have, how they have served you well throughout your years. These hands, though wrinkled shriveled and weak have been the tools I have used all my life to reach out and grab and embrace life.

'They braced and caught my fall when as a toddler I crashed upon the floor.

They put food in my mouth and clothes on my back. As a child, my mother taught me to fold them in prayer. They tied my shoes and pulled on my boots. They held my husband and wiped my tears when he went off to war.

'They have been dirty, scraped and raw , swollen and bent. They were uneasy and clumsy when I tried to hold my newborn daughter. Decorated with my wedding band they showed the world that I was married and loved someone special.

They wrote my letters to him and trembled and shook when I buried my parents.

'They have held my children and grandchildren, consoled neighbors, and shook in fists of anger when I didn't understand.

They have covered my face, combed my hair, and washed and cleansed the rest of my body. They have been sticky and wet, bent and broken, dried and raw. And to this day when not much of anything else of me works real well these hands hold me up, lay me down, and again continue to fold in prayer.

'These hands are the mark of where I've been and the ruggedness of life.

But more importantly it will be these hands that God will reach out and take when he leads me home. And with my hands He will lift me to His side and there I will use these hands to touch the face of Christ.'

I will never look at my hands the same again. But I remember God reached out and took my grandma's hands and led her home.

When my hands are hurt or are sore or when I stroke the face of my children and husband I think of grandma. I know she has been stroked and caressed and held by the hands of God.

I, too, want to touch the face of God and feel His hands upon my face.

When you receive this, say a prayer for the person who sent it to you, and watch God's answer to prayer work in your life. Let's continue praying for one another.

-- Author Unknown

Friday, October 31, 2008